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Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Archive

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Picture of the day archives

2004: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2005: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2006: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2007: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2008: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2009: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2010: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2011: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2012: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2013: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2014: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2015: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2016: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2017: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2018: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2019: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2020: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2021: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2022: January February March April May June July August September October November December

These featured pictures, as scheduled below, appeared as the picture of the day (POTD) on the English Wikipedia's Main Page in the last 30 days.

You can add an automatically updating POTD template to your user page using {{Pic of the day}} (version with blurb) or {{POTD}} (version without blurb). For instructions on how to make custom POTD layouts, see Wikipedia:Picture of the day.Purge server cache


May 17

Altolamprologus compressiceps

Altolamprologus compressiceps is a species of fish in the family Cichlidae, endemic to the shallow rocky areas of Lake Tanganyika. The lake holds at least 250 species of cichlid fish, including species yet to be described. Almost all (98 percent) of Tanganyika cichlid species are endemic to the lake, and it is thus an important biological resource for the study of speciation in evolution. A. compressiceps is categorized as a least-concern species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. This fish was photographed at the Karlsruhe Zoo in Germany.

Photograph credit: H. Zell


May 16

Government House, Baku

The Government House of Baku is a government building housing various state ministries of Azerbaijan. Construction took place between 1936 and 1952 and led to the formation of Lenin Square (later renamed to Azadliq Square) seen here. In 1955, a monument to Vladimir Lenin was installed in front of the building, but this was removed in 1990 during the Azerbaijani independence movement in the aftermath of bloody Black January. A large Azerbaijan flag now flies where Lenin's statue once stood.

Photograph credit: Diego Delso


May 15

Élie Metchnikoff

Élie Metchnikoff (15 May 1845 – 15 July 1916) was a Russian and French zoologist of Romanian noble ancestry and Ukrainian Jewish origin, best known for his pioneering research on immunology, for which he was jointly awarded the 1908 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Paul Ehrlich. Metchnikoff developed a theory that ageing is caused by toxic bacteria in the gut and that consumption of lactic acid could prolong life. Supporters of life extension celebrate 15 May as Metchnikoff Day. This photograph of Metchnikoff working in a laboratory was taken in 1913.

Photograph credit: Agence Rol; restored by Adam Cuerden


May 14

The Hunting of the Snark

The Hunting of the Snark is a nonsense poem by the English writer Lewis Carroll, telling the story of ten characters who cross the ocean to hunt a mysterious creature known as the Snark. The poem was published in 1876 with illustrations by Henry Holiday. This is the eighth plate from Holiday's illustrations, accompanying "Fit the Sixth: The Barrister's Dream". The Barrister, one of the crew members, sleeps and dreams of witnessing the trial of a pig accused of deserting its sty. The Snark is depicted in the foreground, acting as the defence barrister and dressed in robe and wig – the nearest to an illustration of the creature in the set. The Barrister is ultimately woken by the Bellman's bell ringing in his ear, as seen in the bottom left.

Illustration credit: Henry Holiday; restored by Adam Cuerden


May 13

Variable oystercatcher

The variable oystercatcher (Haematopus unicolor) is a species of wader in the family Haematopodidae, endemic to New Zealand. The plumage ranges from pied through mottled to all black in different parts of the bird's range. They search for food in shallow water as the tides ebb and flow. Food is mainly located visually but when it is dark or the food is obscured, they will probe the substrate with their bill. The diet consists of a range of molluscs, crustaceans, worms and sometimes small fish. This bird was photographed at Point Chevalier in Auckland, New Zealand.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


May 12

Sequin

The sequin (zecchino) is a gold coin minted by the Republic of Venice. The design of the coin remained relatively unchanged for more than 500 years, from its introduction in 1284 to the fall of the Venetian Republic at the hands of Napoleon on 12 May 1797. No other coin design has ever been produced over such a long historical period. This coin, with a face value of 50 zecchini, was minted between 1779 and 1789, during the reign of Paolo Renier, the 119th and penultimate doge of Venice. The coin has a diameter of 76 millimetres (3.0 in) and weighs 192.5 grams (6.79 oz), and forms part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Credit: Zecca of Venice; photographed by Andrew Shiva


May 11

Hattie Wyatt Caraway

Hattie Wyatt Caraway (1878–1950) was an American politician who became the first woman elected to serve a full term as a United States senator, representing the state of Arkansas from 1931 to 1945. This photograph was taken in 1914, when her husband was a member of the United States House of Representatives. Although she took an interest in her husband's political career at the time, Caraway avoided the capital's social and political life as well as the campaign for women's suffrage, recalling: "After equal suffrage I just added voting to cooking and sewing and other household duties."

Photograph credit: Harris & Ewing; restored by Adam Cuerden


May 10

Misumena vatia

Misumena vatia, the flower spider, is a species of crab spider found in North America and Europe. Females choose to settle on a flower where they remain stationary, while the much smaller males roam around looking for mates. This female spider was photographed having caught a silver-spotted skipper on a Centaurea jacea flower in Bükk National Park, Hungary.

Photograph credit: Charles J. Sharp


May 9

Map of Europe in 1923 showing political boundaries

A map of Europe in the year 1923, showing political boundaries. The post–World War I treaties (1919–1921) and Revolutions of 1917–1923 had created many new states, including the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic, Irish Free State, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania, a German Republic, an Austrian Republic, Czechoslovakia, the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, and Poland.

Map credit: George Washington Bacon


May 8

Engraving of Hernando de Soto discovering the Mississippi

Hernando de Soto (c. 1500 – 1542) was a Spanish explorer and conquistador who was involved in expeditions in Nicaragua and the Yucatán Peninsula. He played an important role in Francisco Pizarro's conquest of the Inca Empire in present-day Peru, but is best known for leading the first European expedition deep into the territory of the modern-day United States. He was the first European documented as having crossed the Mississippi River, which he did on May 8, 1541, depicted in this engraved vignette, an example of art on United States banknotes. Produced for the Department of the Treasury's Bureau of Engraving and Printing, the engraving is of William Henry Powell's painting Discovery of the Mississippi by De Soto, which hangs in the Capitol rotunda in Washington, D.C.

Engraving credit: Frederick Girsch, after William Henry Powell; restored by Andrew Shiva


May 7

Indian tent turtle

The Indian tent turtle (Pangshura tentoria) is a species of turtle in the family Geoemydidae, endemic to India and Bangladesh. The species's carapace grows to a maximum length of 27 centimetres (11 inches). This turtle of the subspecies P. t. tentoria was photographed beside the Chambal River in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.

Photograph credit: Charles J. Sharp


May 6

Einat Kalisch-Rotem

Einat Kalisch-Rotem (born 1970) is an Israeli urban planner who has served as the mayor of Haifa since November 2018. She unseated the incumbent Yona Yahav in the 2018 mayoral election, becoming the first woman to lead any of Israel's three major cities. Besides her public career, Kalisch-Rotem has a black belt in karate.

Photograph credit: Edward Kaprov


May 5

Eastern chanting goshawk

The eastern chanting goshawk (Melierax poliopterus) is a species of bird of prey in the family Accipitridae endemic to eastern Africa. This species averages 49 to 55 cm (19 to 22 in) long, with a wingspan of 96 to 110 cm (38 to 43 in) and a tail length of 20 to 25 cm (7.9 to 9.8 in). Males average 85 percent the size of females. This eastern chanting goshawk was photographed in Awash National Park, Ethiopia.

Photograph credit: Charles James Sharp


May 4

Sheldonian Theatre

The Sheldonian Theatre is a theatre in Oxford, England, designed by Christopher Wren and built from 1664 to 1669 for the University of Oxford. Used for music concerts, lectures and university ceremonies, the building is named after Gilbert Sheldon, Archbishop of Canterbury, the chancellor of the university at the time, and the project's main financial backer. According to Wren's son, the design was inspired by Sebastiano Serlio's 16th-century engraving of the D-shaped Theatre of Marcellus erected in Rome in the 1st century BC. The ceiling, partly depicted in this photograph of the theatre's interior, consists of thirty-two oil-on-canvas panels originally painted by Robert Streater, King Charles II's court painter, and depicts an allegory of Truth descending upon the Arts and Sciences and expelling ignorance from the university.

Photograph credit: David Iliff


May 3

Whale vocalizations are the sounds used by whales for different kinds of communication. Sounds are produced by cetaceans for various purposes by several different mechanisms. Toothed whales produce rapid bursts of high-frequency clicks that are thought to be primarily for echolocation, while the complex sounds of the humpback whale (and some blue whales) are believed to be primarily used in sexual selection. This young humpback whale is singing in the waters of Vavaʻu, Tonga.

Credit: Sylke Rohrlach


May 2

Talismanic shirt

A talismanic shirt is an item of clothing worn as a talisman. Talismanic shirts are found throughout the Islamic world, and can be grouped into four general types that differ in style and the symbols used: Ottoman, Safavid, Mughal, and West African. Such shirts were believed to be capable of offering protection to the wearer, especially in battle. This 17th-century Turkish talismanic shirt is made of cotton and inscribed with Quranic verses, the names of Allah, Islamic prayers, and views of Mecca and Medina in ink and gold. The shirt forms part of the Khalili Collection of Hajj and the Arts of Pilgrimage.

Textile credit: unknown; photographed by the Khalili Collection of Hajj and the Arts of Pilgrimage


May 1

Naser al-Din Shah Qajar

Naser al-Din Shah Qajar (16 July 1831 – 1 May 1896), was the Shah of Qajar Iran from 5 September 1848 to 1 May 1896 when he was assassinated. He was the son of Mohammad Shah Qajar and Malek Jahān Khānom and the third longest reigning monarch in Iranian history after Shapur II of the Sassanid dynasty and Tahmasp I of the Safavid Dynasty. He was the first modern Persian monarch who formally visited Europe and also wrote his memoirs.

Photograph credit: Nadar; restored by Adam Cuerden


April 30

Charles S. Fairchild

Charles S. Fairchild (April 30, 1842 – November 24, 1924) was a New York businessman and politician who served as United States Secretary of the Treasury from 1887 to 1889 and Attorney General of New York from 1876 to 1877. This line engraving of Fairchild was produced around 1902 by the Department of the Treasury's Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) as part of a BEP presentation album of the first 42 secretaries of the treasury.

Engraving credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; restored by Andrew Shiva

Recently featured:

April 29

Calcite

Calcite is a carbonate mineral and the most stable polymorph of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). This photograph shows fluorescence and birefringence in a calcite crystal with a 445-nanometre laser.

Photograph credit: Jan Pavelka


April 28

Jasmin Moghbeli

Jasmin Moghbeli (born 1983) is an American Marine Corps test pilot and NASA astronaut. As of 2019, she has accumulated more than 2,000 hours of flight time and flown in 150 combat missions, including sorties during the War in Afghanistan. She has been assigned as the commander of the SpaceX Crew-7 mission to the International Space Station, scheduled to launch in 2023. This official portrait of Moghbeli as a NASA astronaut candidate was taken in 2017.

Photograph credit: Bill Stafford


April 27

Collage of forty-two types of seed

Seeds are embryonic plants enclosed in protective outer coverings. This collage of forty-two photomicrographs depicts the seeds of various plants, in rows from left to right:

Photograph credit: Alexander Klepnev


April 26

Warbling white-eye

The warbling white-eye (Zosterops japonicus), also known as the Japanese white-eye or the mountain white-eye, is a small passerine bird in the family Zosteropidae. Native to southeastern Asia, it was introduced to Oahu in 1929, and by 1987 had become the most abundant land bird in the Hawaiian Islands. This warbling white-eye was photographed in Tennōji Park in Osaka, Japan.

Photograph credit: Laitche


April 25

St Lawrence Jewry

St Lawrence Jewry is a Church of England guild church in the City of London on Gresham Street, next to Guildhall. The medieval church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666, and rebuilt to a design by Sir Christopher Wren. The building suffered extensive damage on 29 December 1940, during the Blitz, and was restored in 1957 by Cecil Brown to Wren's original design. It is the official church of the Lord Mayor of London. Wren's church has an aisle only on the north side (in the left-hand side of this photograph), divided from the nave by Corinthian columns. The ceiling is divided into sunken panels, ornamented with wreaths and branches.

Photograph credit: David Iliff


April 24

Serbian Easter breakfast

Balkan cuisine is a type of regional cuisine found across the Balkan region in southeastern Europe. It combines characteristics of European cuisine with some of those from western Asia. This photograph depicts a Serbian breakfast traditionally served on Orthodox Easter, consisting of boiled eggs, cheese, ham, horseradish, scallions, pepper salad with garlic, rye bread, and cinnamon cakes. A similar meal is commonly eaten in Slovenia, but with Slovenian potica instead of cake.

Photograph credit: Petar Milošević


April 23

Blue-sided leaf frog

The blue-sided leaf frog (Agalychnis annae) is a species of tree frog in the family Phyllomedusidae native to the tropical rainforests of Central America. It is known only from the Central Valley of Costa Rica, on the slopes of the Cordillera de Talamanca, the Cordillera de Tilarán and the Cordillera Central, at altitudes between 600 and 1,650 m (2,000 and 5,400 ft). The total extent of its range is estimated to be around 16,000 km2 (6,178 sq mi), and the International Union for Conservation of Nature has listed it as a vulnerable species. This photograph of a blue-sided leaf frog was captured in Heredia Province, Costa Rica, and was focus-stacked from two separate images.

Photograph credit: Charles James Sharp


April 22

Werther

Werther is an opera in four acts by Jules Massenet to a French libretto by Édouard Blau, Paul Milliet and Georges Hartmann. It is loosely based on Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's epistolary novel The Sorrows of Young Werther, which was based both on fact and on Goethe's own early life. This poster, designed by the Swiss artist Eugène Grasset, advertised the opera's first performance in France, which was given by the Opéra-Comique at the Théâtre Lyrique in Paris on 16 January 1893.

Poster credit: Eugène Grasset; restored by Adam Cuerden


April 21

Bar-shouldered dove

The bar-shouldered dove (Geopelia humeralis) is a species of dove, in the family Columbidae, native to Australia and southern New Guinea. Its typical habitat consists of areas of thick vegetation where water is present, damp gullies, forests and gorges, mangroves, plantations, swamps, eucalyptus woodland, tropical and sub-tropical shrubland, and river margins. It can be found in both inland and coastal regions. This bar-shouldered dove was photographed in Brunkerville, New South Wales.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


April 20

Gare du Nord

The Gare du Nord, officially Paris-Nord, is one of six large mainline railway station termini in Paris, France. In 2015, it was the busiest railway station in Europe by total passenger numbers, with more than 700,000 passengers alighting or disembarking per day. The current Gare du Nord was designed by French architect Jacques Ignace Hittorff and constructed between 1861 and 1865, replacing an earlier and much smaller terminal that was operational between 1846 and 1860. This interior view of the station's main hall was captured from the balcony level.

Photograph credit: David Iliff


April 19

Glenn T. Seaborg

Glenn T. Seaborg (April 19, 1912 – February 25, 1999) was an American chemist whose involvement in the synthesis, discovery and investigation of ten transuranium elements earned him a share of the 1951 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. His work in this area also led to his development of the actinide concept and the arrangement of the actinide series in the periodic table. He was the principal or co-discoverer of ten elements, including seaborgium, which was named in his honor while he was still living. This 1950 photograph depicts Seaborg in a laboratory with an elution column used for the ion exchange of actinide elements.

Photograph credit: unknown; restored by Bammesk


April 18

1906 San Francisco earthquake

The 1906 San Francisco earthquake struck the coast of Northern California at 5:12 a.m. on April 18, with an estimated moment magnitude of 7.9. Devastating fires soon broke out in San Francisco and lasted for several days. More than 3,000 people died, and over 80 percent of the city was destroyed. The events are remembered as one of the worst and deadliest earthquakes in the history of the United States. This photograph depicts the aftermath of the earthquake around Post Street and Grant Avenue.

Photograph credit: H. D. Chadwick; restored by Yann Forget


Picture of the day archives

2004: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2005: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2006: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2007: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2008: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2009: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2010: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2011: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2012: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2013: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2014: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2015: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2016: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2017: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2018: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2019: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2020: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2021: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2022: January February March April May June July August September October November December